Posts Tagged ‘wake tech’

Why Aren’t I Working?

December 12th, 2010

It’s December, so it’s the time of year that people look back over the past year and judge what they have achieved or not achieved.

I suppose we’re getting ready to line up our New Year’s Resolutions.

I’ve accomplished a lot over the past year. With others, I started a non-profit to heighten awareness for retired racing greyhound adoption.

I started my own blog and website for unemployment and job searching here in the triangle.

I picked up a gig writing the Job Tech Review column for Cubicle to Classroom, an online magazine.

I “intern” (read unpaid) as the community facilitator for Hire Friday.

I attended numerous networking functions – met people, made friends, expanded my LinkedIn connections.

I’ve taken advantage of the free training available to job seekers through the local community colleges, as well as seminars and workshops to keep my certifications current.

I ended up an SME in social media for job search, to the point I’m giving talks and workshops on it.

I’ve volunteered – a lot.

What I haven’t done is found a job.

It’s at this point that I recognize the plight and frustration of the unemployed, myself included.

We’ve done everything we are told to do to find a job – networked, volunteered, gotten education, kept current.  We’ve filled out numerous applications online, met for gallons of coffee with folks, attended workshops, spent time and effort and nothing seems to work.

If I’m doing everything we’re being told to do, why aren’t I working?

Well, I’m here to say there’s no magic bullet.

Before this devolves into what could easily become a pity party and whine-fest — really, I’m not playing the victim here — I’d like to suggest that this time of year is as good as any to take stock of what you are doing.

If what you are it isn’t working, change it up.  Set aside time for yourself – figure out a way to rejuvenate yourself.  Treat yourself to something you’ve done without for a while.  Add some different exercise into your daily routine — actually change your exercise routine.  Drive a different route to the grocery store. Trade out the groups and meetings you attend for new ones.   Use the library instead of the home office to construct your project plan for being employed.   Get out there and hustle.

I recently discovered Gary Vaynerchuk, of Wine Library TV.  I must admit I came a bit late to the table on this one.  Gary Vaynerchuk has been out there talking about work and entrepreneurial endeavors for a while now.  But much of what he is talking about is applicable to a job search.  Pardon the rough language, but this is someone who is truly passionate about what he does – in every incarnation.  In the age of motivational speakers who don’t motivate me at all, he is a rarity.  Enjoy – but you might want to close the door before tuning up the sound.

On the bright side, three women who I’ve met through my job search networking have all landed jobs in the past few weeks.  I take this as a good sign.

What are you going to do to change what isn’t working for you?

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It’s “A” Little Thing

October 18th, 2010

I’ll pretty much answer to anything – Info Yenta, Data Diva, jw, Joanne.

I never really thought of my name as being that difficult, but the increase in being referred to as “Joanne” is having me rethinking this issue.

I’ve been called by the wrong name much of my life.  When I was in High School, I even had my name spelled three different ways incorrectly in a programme.  Perhaps this is my destiny.

My email address is my last name followed by my first name, and my name — along with my email address and twitter handle — accompanies each email I send out at the bottom in my signature file.  Come to think of it, my business cards pretty much have it spelled out clearly as well.

Just for the record, my name is Joanna Wolfe – that’s Joanna with an “a” and Wolfe with an “e” at the end of each.

You may be thinking, so what’s the big deal?  Why even bother to bring it up?

Well, in a job search, where you are trying to making an impression and make yourself memorable, the last thing you want to be is remembered for a name which is not yours.

Having lived with being called by the wrong name and having my named misspelled much of my life, I’m constantly challenged on how best to address the issue.

You want people to remember your name, not someone else’s name.

Think about it.  You would never want to address your potential new manager by the wrong name or spell it incorrectly in an email or thank you note.

But the if the tables are turned, how do you correct the interviewer, screener, or recruiter?

I struggle with the amount of people who call me Joanne, address me as Joanne in emails, and introduce me as Joanne – and these are people I’ve known for a fair amount of time, in some cases years.  I mean, it sounds pretty ungrateful for me to correct these people.  After all, they’ve taken the time to contact me and speak to me.  I don’t want to offend them or come across as difficult –  but I’d like to claim my name back.

William Blackmon, who teaches the LinkMeIn* course at Wake Tech, actually has a novel way of approaching this issue.  He suggests for names that are misspelled that you actually list the common misspellings of your name in the Summary statement in your Linked In profile.  That way if someone is searching for, say “Joanne Wolf”, they are presented, not only with the Joanne Wolf’s of the world, but (in this case) me as well.

Mike Komives, who runs the St. Thomas More Jobs Network, and teaches the workshop Networking and Job Search Strategies for the Mature Professional at Durham Tech**, suggests spelling out your name when introducing yourself or making an elevator speech.

Me, well, I’ll just keep introducing myself as Joanna, or as I have taken to when being introduced by others “Joann-NA“,  and hope people will remember the “a”.  After all, it is “a” little thing.

How do you approach problems you may encounter with your name?

* The next LinkMeIn course will be given on Friday, October 22nd at Wake Tech’s West Campus in Cary (Kildaire Farms Road between Penny and Ten Ten).  There are two sessions:  Basics 8:30am to 11:30  and then Next Steps & Advance 12:30pm to 3:30pm.  To register, send an email to pstaylor@waketech.edu.  This course is free to folks who are unemployed.

** The next Networking and Job Search Strategies for the Mature Professional will be begin on Tuesday, October 19th at the  OCSDC Job Skills Center, 503 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill.  The class runs 1:00 to 4:00 PM. No pre-registration required.  Attend one of the first two sessions to register.  Questions? Contact: mike@mikekomives.com.

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Seeing Green – Green Economy, Green Careers, Green Jobs

August 24th, 2010

It seems the world is going green these days.

In the span of the next 8 weeks there are green events everywhere you look.

Want to understand the new Green Economy?  Michael Gaudet of Green Peak Research is presenting a class Transitioning to the New Green Economy at Wake Tech’s Cary Campus this week on Wednesday and Thursday this week  — August 25 – 26, 2010.  You can still attend the class, email Pat Taylor (pstaylor@waketech.edu) at Wake Tech and/or Michael Gaudet (mgaudet1@waketech.edu) directly to enroll.  It’s free to folks who are unemployed, underemployed or pending a layoff.

Green Drinks is going to be on the Greens – the Lonnie Poole Golf Course greens at NCSU that is, on Thursday, August 26, 2010.  For more information: http://www.triangleusgbc.org/events/event/150-green-drinks-drinks-on-the-green

A follow up to Transitioning to the New Green Economy, a one day course — Targeting Green Jobs in NC will be held on September 1, 2010 at Wake Tech’s Cary Campus, as with the previous course, it is free to folks who are unemployed, underemployed or pending a layoff.  Email Pat Taylor (pstaylor@waketech.edu) at Wake Tech and/or Michael Gaudet (mgaudet1@waketech.edu) directly to enroll.

Green NC (Career Day, Education Sessions, Trade Show, and Awards) will be held on Thursday, September 9, 2010 at the NCSU McKimmon Center.  This event focuses on the Green Building, and is sponsored by the US Green Building Council NC Chapter.

The SJF 2010 Summit on the New Green Economy on Tuesday and Wednesday, September 14 – 15, 2010 will be held at the Downtown Durham Convention Center.

And the State Fair October 14 – 24, 2010 is getting into the action with an exhibit called Green NC.  Between the Deep Fried Twinkies and Pig Races, check out the exhibit.

And as if you haven’t seen enough Green yet, Triangle Business Journal is holding their Green Awards and Expo at the Embassy Suites in Cary on Tuesday, October 19, 2010.

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Another Link in the Chain – Wake Tech hosts free LinkedIn training

June 11th, 2010
Not sure how to use Linked In?  Want to get more use out of the Linked In account that you have?
William Blackmon, PMP, CSM, BSEE, will be teaching beginning basics and advanced courses on how to get the most out of Linked In on June 18th and 25th!
Wake Tech (West campus) will host their “LinkMeIn” training series Friday, June 18th and 25th. details of the class are below.  As with all HRD (Human Resource Development) courses offered by Wake and Durham Tech, there is no cost to the Unemployed, Underemployed.

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LinkMeIn Basics 8:30am – 11:30am
LinkMeIn Advanced 12:30pm – 3:30pm
Dates offered: Friday, June 18, 2010 and Friday June 25, 2010
Location: Wake Tech West campus (a.ka. Millpond)
There is a 1 hour lunch break between sessions, but lunch is not provided.
This event is a two-part training course ideal for any professional interested in building up a Linkedin profile as well as those who wish to learn how to enhance their existing profile and use many of the tools, features, and applications LinkedIn has to offer.  For a 2 minute video introduction to Linked in click here.
The “LinkedIn Training” classes are offered by the Human Resource Development (HRD) department of Wake Tech routinely throughout the Summer 2010 semester. All HRD courses are offered at NO CHARGE to individuals who are unemployed or who have received notice of a layoff or pending layoff. HRD courses are also free to those who may be “underemployed” as determined by state and federal guidelines. Please contact Pat Taylor (Pstaylor@waketech.edu) to register or for eligibility requirements.
Prerequisite is you must have a LinkedIn account ID, password, and have activated your account prior to attending the Basics class.
For address and directions to the West campus site please go to this link: http://locations.waketech.edu/
SPECIAL NOTE! These classes are limited to only 16 seats due to computer availability. It is highly recommended that you pre-register to secure a seat. The June 18th class is 90% full at the time of this message being sent out. So please preregister for the June 25th class ASAP.
You ask which class is right for you?  Here is the course curriculum so you can determine what you wish to learn more about.
Basics:
Introduction to LinkedIn
Create Your Account
Building Your Profile
Privacy Settings
Making Connections
Joining Groups
Manage Your Rolodex & Mailbox
Where to get Help
Q/A Session

Next Steps & Advanced: (pending minor updates)
Review Your Profile
Asking for Recommendations
The Power of the Rolodex
Advance People Search
Advance Job & Company Research
LinkedIn Jobseekers Tool
Making Introductions
Applications
Q/A session
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Your Tax Dollars at Work – Part 1

June 10th, 2010

For years you have paid state and federal taxes, now’s the time to put those dollars to work for you.

I hadn’t originally planned to write to this topic today.  But over the last few days, I’ve received email and met people reminding me that not everyone is aware of, or taking advantage of, the free classes, workshops, and training available to them.

I’ve posted a couple of times that local community colleges – Wake Tech and Durham Tech – offer free courses to people who are unemployed, underemployed, have been notified of an impending layoff or meet other federal/state guideline criteria as part of their HRD or Human Resource Development program.  These courses are funded by your tax dollars.

These courses include (but are not limited to):

  • job preparedness certificates for Hospitality, Medical Front Office, Financial Sector, Human Resources
  • computer skills – computer basics, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Access
  • jobs search workshops – resume writing, interviewing, how to use LinkedIn, job search strategies

Even if you think you are pretty good at using Microsoft Office, or you feel your resume is fine, it is still worth considering enrolling in a course.

This can benefit you two ways.  First, you will meet people and expand your network.  Second, it is still likely that you will learn something.  You probably don’t know everything about how to use a computer or application, and you may discover a different way to present information on your resume or in an interview.

It is always worth your time to learn something new.

HOWEVER, this doesn’t mean that you should fill up your week, every week, with classes.  You still need time to digest what you are learning.  And you need to convert what you are learning into action in your job search.

Take digestible bites; pace yourself.

So whether it’s learning Microsoft Access, or how to revamp your resume, plan some training time into your schedule.

Your homework?  Review the schedules at Durham Tech and Wake Tech and find a class that will add to your career search arsenal – and register!  Comment and tell us what you’ve chosen and why.  Who knows, you may just find a classmate to join you.

Been to a class?  Attending one?  Comment and share with us your experience, and what you learned.

Next Thursday, I’ll be addressing the Workforce Investment Act and how to get funding for finishing a degree or getting professional certification.

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