Posts Tagged ‘training’

Smart CEOs are Hiring the Unemployed (or at least they should be )

January 17th, 2011

Hey CEO’s!  If I could save you time, money, and attrition at your company, organization or business would you listen to me?

If I could show you how to increase your profits, orders, donations, services to your customers would it be worth your time?

Well, listen up.

For anyone who has been out of work for an extended period of time, last Friday’s Huffington Post article, How Employers Weed Out Unemployed Job Applicants, Others, Behind The Scenes isn’t news.

Anyone who has been looking for a while has hit up against the bias of employers passing them over in favor of people currently working.  Recruiters and HR staff cite that they are getting their marching orders from the top because people who are unemployed are perceived as not being up to speed, not current or just lazy and unqualified.

To tell you the truth, in a weird way I admire the folks who actually admit their bias.  As someone seeking work, it is far better to know where not to waste my time, than to try to uncover whether or not an employer is weeding out candidates based on unemployment status.

Smart CEO’s have done their homework and know such practices are neither immoral nor illegal.  But what you may not know, CEOs, is what you are doing is bad business.  Oh, people who are unemployed may argue that it’s unfair or not right; but we all know what’s driving the decision.  It’s the bottom line.  Money talks.

Okay, I’m going look at this from your big chair at the head of the board table.

And, for those of you playing along at home who are unemployed, you should listen, too.

Profit is driving decisions today;  or at the very least, there is a need to grow and support a non-profit,  to provide funding and grants to educational institutions, or supply a tax base for government services to keep organizations viable.  Everyone needs to know the dollars they spend today will return to keep their company or organization in the black, not put them in the red.

We all can agree on that point, right?  No big news here.  But how do you do it?  The economy is recovering… slowly.  How can you speed up the process, how can you make gains this quarter and the next?

Hey, are you still with me?  I’m going to let you in on a secret.

If you want the economy to recover faster, if you want to add money to your budget rather than slash it, want investment in your business, want consumers to buy your products, want people to donate to your cause HIRE SOMEONE WHO IS UNEMPLOYED.

I wrote about this in December – granted you were probably busy with end of year closings, trying to figure out if you could give your remaining employees some type of holiday bonus, or just caught up in all the festivities that occur between Thanksgiving and New Years – so in case you missed it, I’ll give you the gist of of what I said.

Not hiring someone because they are unemployed — regardless of your position on the subject — is bad business.

As an employer you may complain you aren’t getting orders for your goods, your staff budgets are cut, you’re being made to do more with less because the economic recovery is too slow.  Well, you may not like it, but those things you are complaining about? — you’re perpetuating them.

Here’s how you can fix your business, and the economy – HIRE SOMEONE WHO IS UNEMPLOYED.

Hiring someone who is unemployed is like watching the dominoes fall.

When an unemployed person gets a job they stop collecting unemployment — paid for by tax dollars — and start contributing to the tax base.

When an unemployed person gets a job they can pay their bills so they don’t amass debt and end up filing for bankruptcy leaving their lenders high and dry.

When an unemployed person gets a job mortgages are paid on time and foreclosure is avoided.  This not only means banks don’t have to be bailed out, it reduces the devaluation of everyone else’s homes.

When an unemployed person gets a job they spend money.  They pay for goods, services and contribute to charitable causes.  They become consumers and stimulate the economy.

When an unemployed person gets a job they stop draining their 401ks and IRAs.  They start saving and investing.  They contribute to retirement plans and college funds which translates into investment in stocks and bonds and mutual funds.  The market gains, and city, state and federal government bonds fund infrastructure projects and create jobs.

The talent pool of unemployed people out there is vast.  Take advantage of it.  These are people with training, skills and experience.  They’re chomping at the bit to work — and currently there’s a fire sale.

Where I am here in North Carolina many unemployed are not only college educated professionals, but have advanced degrees as well.  These people are tech savvy and ramp up quickly.

Oh, I hear you protest — “they’ll just leave when the economy gets better”, “they’re not going to stick around for the long term”, “they’re just waiting for a better job”.

Well, here’s a reality check.

The economy isn’t getting better any time fast unless people get jobs and start working.

As to looking for long term employees, look at the average time the people who are unemployed have worked for their previous employers — now look at that candidate of yours who is already employed.  Who has a better record of long term employment and loyalty?  Besides, if that candidate you are looking at is willing to jump ship to work for you, who is to say they aren’t going to be willing to leave you in the dust for the next passing ship.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “The length of time a worker remains with the same employer increases with the age at which the worker began the job.  Of the jobs that workers began when they were 18 to 22 years of age, 72% of those jobs ended in less than a year and 94% ended in fewer than 5 years.  Among jobs started by 39- to 44-year-olds, 33% ended in less than a year and 68% ended in fewer than 5 years.”

Hey, that’s a recommendation for older workers as well!

And regarding waiting for a better job?  A recent survey by Right Management showed that a whopping 84% of workers are planning on seeking new employment in 2011.  So that excuse isn’t going to fly.

People who are employed are less willing to bear the burden of covering two people’s jobs.  Employees are burnt out, stressed out and just plain tired of doing more with less for the last 3 years.  A recent article on Beyond Morale, a blog on employee engagement, underscores that those people who have been left behind to do the job of two people (or more) on their single salary are disgruntled and less loyal.

On the other hand, I’m pretty sure a newly employed, former long-term unemployed worker would be hungry, thankful and happy for meaningful work.  After all, they’ve dealt with trying to make ends meet on a fraction of what they previously earned.  They’ve already lived with the stigma and other negative attributes associated with unemployment — and they aren’t looking to return there any time soon.

Hey, CEOs are you still there?  Do you still think it’s smart passing over the person who is unemployed to fill your vacant position?  You have an opportunity; will you take advantage of it?  You have the ability to do the one thing an unemployed person can’t do for themselves – HIRE SOMEONE WHO IS UNEMPLOYED.

Not hiring someone because they are unemployed is bad business.  But luckily, you can fix that.

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Video Friday – Best Careers 2011

January 7th, 2011

You may not be aware of it, but US News has an extensive Careers section.  They recently pulled together a list of the 50 best careers.  The short video below talks about how they did their research and what they found to be the best careers of 2011.

Check out the Best Careers section of their website.  What career path do you think is the right one for you?

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Video Friday – Sometimes Dreams Do Come True

December 24th, 2010

Sometimes you may not be what people may think is the perfect candidate for the job.

Despite what often seems to be overwhelming odds, there are those who persevere.  They study, train and overcome insurmountable odds.

Group interviews are difficult at the best of times, but sometimes it pays to just be yourself.

What have you done this week to get your job search to move forward?

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Video Friday – Interviewing Skills

December 17th, 2010

Sometimes you need to assess your skills, look at what you could be doing better. Today, we’re going to look at interviewing skills.

So what did we learn?

  • Always practice your answers and be prepared
  • Always tell the truth – you will be caught if you lie
  • Always carry extra copies of your resume with you to an interview – you never know when one might have a drink spilled on it or break

What did you learn from this video?

Have a good weekend folks!

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Why Aren’t I Working?

December 12th, 2010

It’s December, so it’s the time of year that people look back over the past year and judge what they have achieved or not achieved.

I suppose we’re getting ready to line up our New Year’s Resolutions.

I’ve accomplished a lot over the past year. With others, I started a non-profit to heighten awareness for retired racing greyhound adoption.

I started my own blog and website for unemployment and job searching here in the triangle.

I picked up a gig writing the Job Tech Review column for Cubicle to Classroom, an online magazine.

I “intern” (read unpaid) as the community facilitator for Hire Friday.

I attended numerous networking functions – met people, made friends, expanded my LinkedIn connections.

I’ve taken advantage of the free training available to job seekers through the local community colleges, as well as seminars and workshops to keep my certifications current.

I ended up an SME in social media for job search, to the point I’m giving talks and workshops on it.

I’ve volunteered – a lot.

What I haven’t done is found a job.

It’s at this point that I recognize the plight and frustration of the unemployed, myself included.

We’ve done everything we are told to do to find a job – networked, volunteered, gotten education, kept current.  We’ve filled out numerous applications online, met for gallons of coffee with folks, attended workshops, spent time and effort and nothing seems to work.

If I’m doing everything we’re being told to do, why aren’t I working?

Well, I’m here to say there’s no magic bullet.

Before this devolves into what could easily become a pity party and whine-fest — really, I’m not playing the victim here — I’d like to suggest that this time of year is as good as any to take stock of what you are doing.

If what you are it isn’t working, change it up.  Set aside time for yourself – figure out a way to rejuvenate yourself.  Treat yourself to something you’ve done without for a while.  Add some different exercise into your daily routine — actually change your exercise routine.  Drive a different route to the grocery store. Trade out the groups and meetings you attend for new ones.   Use the library instead of the home office to construct your project plan for being employed.   Get out there and hustle.

I recently discovered Gary Vaynerchuk, of Wine Library TV.  I must admit I came a bit late to the table on this one.  Gary Vaynerchuk has been out there talking about work and entrepreneurial endeavors for a while now.  But much of what he is talking about is applicable to a job search.  Pardon the rough language, but this is someone who is truly passionate about what he does – in every incarnation.  In the age of motivational speakers who don’t motivate me at all, he is a rarity.  Enjoy – but you might want to close the door before tuning up the sound.

On the bright side, three women who I’ve met through my job search networking have all landed jobs in the past few weeks.  I take this as a good sign.

What are you going to do to change what isn’t working for you?

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