Posts Tagged ‘iPhone’

5 You May Have Missed – I’ll Take Potpourri for $300, Alex

November 24th, 2010

Jeopardy calls it Potpourri, a mixed assortment of items that don’t easily fall into one category or another.  This week I found a few articles of interest, that don’t really have much to do with one another, but provided some grist for the thought mill, or at the very least some amusement for the short work week.

The first two articles come from a place I normally am not too enthused about – CareerBuilder.  I am usually put off by the amount of roadblocks that CareerBuilder puts up between you and the job listing or application.  But I was pleasantly surprised at the lack of hurdles to pass to get to their blog.

‘Overqualified’ Workers Struggle to Find Work, Employers Fear They’ll Flee via CareerBuilder‘s The Work Buzz

Normally, I’d run screaming in the opposite direction when faced with an article such as What Your Pet Says About Your Career.  I generally would categorize such writing in the same bucket at your astrology forecast.  But there’s something about a basket full of cute kittens that will draw you in every time.  And really, who wouldn’t want to know what snakes say about their owners potential earnings?

What Your Pet Says About Your Career via CareerBuilder‘s The Work Buzz

In August of this year, Wired magazine announced the Web is Dead, this next blog entry offers a similar thought on IT careers – is it time to start thinking about a new career path?:

Big IT is Broken via Baselinemag.com

If you’ve started to use Twitter as a job search tool, you may want to brush up on your Twitter etiquette.  Here’s some insight into why folks may choose to unfollow you, as well as some general hints on how to behave:

Five Reasons We’re Going to Unfollow You on Twitter via Social Meteor

And finally, if you are using your iPhone, Android, Blackberry, whatever to send and receive email, text messages and tweets, beware the auto correct:

Damn You, Autocorrect – this website actually underscores the need to review before hitting send.  Many of the auto-corrections turn simple text into messages not appropriate for an office environment.

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