Archive for the ‘linked in’ category

5 You May Have Missed – 2010 Year in Review – Web & Social Media

December 15th, 2010

Wrapping up 2010 everyone is putting out their lists of top 10 this and that.  This past week has revealed what the dominating forces in the Web and Social Media offer regarding the past year.  What does all this have to do with your Job Search?  Well, the Web and Social Media reflect what is going on in our world and we have to pay attention to it.  You don’t have to be an expert, but you need to be conversant in these technologies so you are able to speak intelligently where these technology intersect with the company or organization you have targeted in your search.

Google – What We Searched

Penn-Olson.com discusses what Google offers in their look back.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn offers what are the Top 10 (and Overused) Buzzwords on LinkedIn Profiles.

YouTube

YouTube dedicated a channel to look back on the past year in video – Rewind.

Twitter

Mashable offered up what they saw as the Most Powerful Tweets of 2010.

Facebook

Facebook Reveals Top Global Status Trends in 2010 via AllFacebook.com

When these types of lists come out, I’m always curious as to where happenings of the month of December end up.  They can’t put December 2010 in 2011, so officially, I guess nothing happens in December.  And while we’re on this topic, since there are 12 months in a year, why don’t we look back at the top 12 for the year?

Regardless, what are some of your top 10 or 12 for the past year?

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Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish

October 29th, 2010

Do you see your unemployment as an opportunity?

For most of us who are unemployed, one of the most difficult parts of our journey is what got us here.

We are unemployed, laid off, displaced, in transition (and who thought that one up anyway?) — we are unwanted.

It may have come in a phone call, an email, an interoffice memo, or a face to face meeting.  We were informed that we were no longer needed to perform the job that paid our bills, help put our kids through college, funded our family vacations, covered our medical expenses, made possible our planned retirement, and in many ways fulfilled our lives, nourished our minds, satisfied our souls.

So much of our identity is wrapped up in what now is our past job title or set of responsibilities — and in many ways I think that this is even more so for men who head families and may be the primary breadwinner.

Now that when we find ourselves out of a job we may not feel that we have an identity any longer.  We seem to float around in some odd state of limbo.

We spend a lot of time worrying — and rightly so — about finding the next job and returning to work.  Unfortunately, we don’t take the opportunity to celebrate the fact that not having a job is an opportunity to explore avenues previously closed off due to the obligations of a job.

Did you know that Steve Jobs was fired from Apple? In this video, Steve Jobs speaks about several things, but in particular, how his being fired from Apple offered him an opportunity to reinvent, change and grow.

I attended the CED‘s Start Something celebration last night at the American Tobacco Campus and toured the new American Underground.  The whole purpose of what is being done at American Underground is to create an environment that nurtures new ideas and innovation.

Jobs’ advice to the graduating class at Stanford doesn’t have to be only for the young eager students graduating from college. Each of us on our journey to the next point in our career can take his advice and move forward.

Perhaps your unemployment will allow you to be like Steve Jobs.

Perhaps we all should Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish.

What is this time in your life going to allow you to create, innovate, explore? What have you done foolish lately?

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It’s “A” Little Thing

October 18th, 2010

I’ll pretty much answer to anything – Info Yenta, Data Diva, jw, Joanne.

I never really thought of my name as being that difficult, but the increase in being referred to as “Joanne” is having me rethinking this issue.

I’ve been called by the wrong name much of my life.  When I was in High School, I even had my name spelled three different ways incorrectly in a programme.  Perhaps this is my destiny.

My email address is my last name followed by my first name, and my name — along with my email address and twitter handle — accompanies each email I send out at the bottom in my signature file.  Come to think of it, my business cards pretty much have it spelled out clearly as well.

Just for the record, my name is Joanna Wolfe – that’s Joanna with an “a” and Wolfe with an “e” at the end of each.

You may be thinking, so what’s the big deal?  Why even bother to bring it up?

Well, in a job search, where you are trying to making an impression and make yourself memorable, the last thing you want to be is remembered for a name which is not yours.

Having lived with being called by the wrong name and having my named misspelled much of my life, I’m constantly challenged on how best to address the issue.

You want people to remember your name, not someone else’s name.

Think about it.  You would never want to address your potential new manager by the wrong name or spell it incorrectly in an email or thank you note.

But the if the tables are turned, how do you correct the interviewer, screener, or recruiter?

I struggle with the amount of people who call me Joanne, address me as Joanne in emails, and introduce me as Joanne – and these are people I’ve known for a fair amount of time, in some cases years.  I mean, it sounds pretty ungrateful for me to correct these people.  After all, they’ve taken the time to contact me and speak to me.  I don’t want to offend them or come across as difficult –  but I’d like to claim my name back.

William Blackmon, who teaches the LinkMeIn* course at Wake Tech, actually has a novel way of approaching this issue.  He suggests for names that are misspelled that you actually list the common misspellings of your name in the Summary statement in your Linked In profile.  That way if someone is searching for, say “Joanne Wolf”, they are presented, not only with the Joanne Wolf’s of the world, but (in this case) me as well.

Mike Komives, who runs the St. Thomas More Jobs Network, and teaches the workshop Networking and Job Search Strategies for the Mature Professional at Durham Tech**, suggests spelling out your name when introducing yourself or making an elevator speech.

Me, well, I’ll just keep introducing myself as Joanna, or as I have taken to when being introduced by others “Joann-NA“,  and hope people will remember the “a”.  After all, it is “a” little thing.

How do you approach problems you may encounter with your name?

* The next LinkMeIn course will be given on Friday, October 22nd at Wake Tech’s West Campus in Cary (Kildaire Farms Road between Penny and Ten Ten).  There are two sessions:  Basics 8:30am to 11:30  and then Next Steps & Advance 12:30pm to 3:30pm.  To register, send an email to pstaylor@waketech.edu.  This course is free to folks who are unemployed.

** The next Networking and Job Search Strategies for the Mature Professional will be begin on Tuesday, October 19th at the  OCSDC Job Skills Center, 503 West Franklin Street, Chapel Hill.  The class runs 1:00 to 4:00 PM. No pre-registration required.  Attend one of the first two sessions to register.  Questions? Contact: mike@mikekomives.com.

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Shameless Plug – Find a Job in 140 Characters or Less

October 10th, 2010

After more than a year out of work Amy M. of St. Louis, MO is back 2 work thanks 2 #Twitter.  Alison S. of Green Bay, WI is back 2 work 2. (138 characters)

Find out their stories & how #Twitter can help #jobseekers thru #jobhuntchat & #hirefriday, as well as other #Twitter job search tools. (135 characters)

Join @joannawolfe @ ProNet Raleigh’s monthly meeting @UOPX in #Raleigh 10/12 9-11am to learn more about #Twitter RSVP http://bit.ly/9KaUbq (138 characters)

Find out how 2 set up a #Twitter account, get 2 know useful #Twitter Tools, & ways #jobseekers are using Twitter 2 find their next job. (135 characters)

If U can decipher the sentences above, U may B able 2 land UR next job in 140 characters or less! (if not, we’ll help you figure it out) (136 characters)

And for those of you who don’t tweet…

I’ll be talking about the how Twitter can be a powerful tool for your job search at the next ProNet Raleigh.  You don’t have to have a smart phone to use Twitter.  All you need is a computer and a few minutes a day.

What: ProNet Raleigh

When: Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Where: University of Phoenix offices

5511 Capital Center Drive
Raleigh, NC, 27606-3380
Phone: 919.854.2121

Take Jones Franklin Road exit from the Beltline (440), just north/west of 1-40 interchange.

Who: ProNet Raleigh is sponsored by EDSI (www.edsitriangle.com) who helps mid-level professionals attain jobs, training, and more.

RSVP: http://events.linkedin.com/ProNet-Raleigh-Free-Professional/pub/440211

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Don’t Say That, Say This

October 4th, 2010

You get to your interview, shake hands, take a seat and the person across from you smiles and says “So tell me a little about yourself…”

Despite the fact that you think this is a friendly question, and the interviewer is looking to break the ice by learning a bit about your prize winning roses or poodle, it isn’t.

This is the serpent tempting you with the apple.  Just say no.

Bob Gates and Al Rankin, two retired executives run — in my opinion — one of the best Job Seeker groups in the Triangle.  They do a great job, and one of their favorite topics is a document called “How to answer the 64 Toughest Interview Questions“.

On the list of questions, “Tell me about yourself” in number one.

While the question seems innocent enough, don’t be lulled into a false sense of security that your interviewer wants to know your life’s history.  It’s great that you might have golf in common, or belong to the same service organization.  However, the true goal of this question is to find out how you fit the job.

The best way to handle this question is to be prepared.  Do your homework — about the organization, the people you are meeting with as part of the interview process, the people who you might meet with in the interview process.  Be informed — know who the president is, when the organization was founded, look up their latest press releases.  Know the job description and requirements before you enter the room — and practice how your knowledge, skills and background meet the company’s need.

Do some investigation and figure out what problems this position needs to solve, how it fits in the overall structure of the company, and how that relates to what you’ve done before, or what skills you have are transferrible to meet the need.

Now take a deep breath — shoulders back, sit up straight, and tell me about yourself.

What was the toughest interview question you ever came across?

~~~~~~~~~~~

Note on “How to Answer the 64 Toughest Interview Questions”:

I’ve tried to research the origin of this document — there are several copies of it floating around on the Internet.  But to the best of my ability, I have yet to find who the originators or authors of this document are, and who might own the copyright.  Suffice to say, it appears to be a document in the public domain.

That said, I have decided that it might be of value to go through the questions one by one and talk about possible answers and pitfall that await us in that all important interview.  Over the coming weeks and months, you will find questions from this document discussed here on the job blog.  I invite you to chime in with your experiences and lessons learned from the interview process.

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